The amount of disdain creatives seem to have for PowerPoints has always been surprising to us. They will take time to craft a brand and marketing materials, but when it comes to PowerPoints they seem to do the bare minimum - it seems to be an afterthought.

Usually actual content isn’t used when designing them (how can you design for what you can’t see?), and usually only a cover slide design and perhaps a few interior pages are designed. Almost like PowerPoints don’t really matter.

That’s not how we see it.

The PowerPoint is the front line of your marketing efforts. It’s when your sales team is actually in there, and actually communicating what your company does. The PowerPoint is that story.

It’s also where our clients can really set themselves apart from the competition. Their prospects have seen copy-heavy PPTs laden with bullet points and mismatched graphics day after day. Sitting down to something fresh, clean and clear can make a huge impact and can convert to sales and deals being made.

So yeah, it’s pretty dang important.

There are a few methods we use to make sure our clients’ PowerPoints work the best they can.

1. DEVELOP A STORY
When you take a big picture look at the PPT, does it have a narrative arc?

2. CADENCE
A great way to engage your audience is to mix up the cadence from time to time with bold graphics and messaging.

3. ONE IDEA PER SLIDE
If you have more than one idea per slide, your audience is less likely to retain any ideas at all!

We’ve created PowerPoints using these methods (and we have a few more tricks up our sleeve depending on the specific deck) for many of our clients. Because most of these PowerPoints are used confidentially for sales presentations we can't share them here, but below is a sample of the type of approach we take visually and how we lead into the content of the presentation. 

A bold, attractively designed cover makes the audience more excited about the contents. It promises a graphic, thoughtful experience.

A bold, attractively designed cover makes the audience more excited about the contents. It promises a graphic, thoughtful experience.

Bang! The main point of the presentation is the first thing the audience sees. We will prove this idea with the content of the presentation, and then reiterate it at the end.

Bang! The main point of the presentation is the first thing the audience sees. We will prove this idea with the content of the presentation, and then reiterate it at the end.

A slide that let's the audience know they are indeed the correct audience.

A slide that let's the audience know they are indeed the correct audience.

A bold transition slide let's the audience clearly know we are entering a different portion of the presentation - the content section.

A bold transition slide let's the audience clearly know we are entering a different portion of the presentation - the content section.

The content section brings the expectation that the content will be content heavy. This is where content overload often occurs and when eyes glaze over. This is also an opportunity for well designed PPTs to surprise with a simple, clear message.

The content section brings the expectation that the content will be content heavy. This is where content overload often occurs and when eyes glaze over. This is also an opportunity for well designed PPTs to surprise with a simple, clear message.

Again, one main idea per slide helps to engage the audience. The presentation would continue in this manner, with additional interior content and finally conclude by reiterating the main point made at the beginning of the presentation.

Again, one main idea per slide helps to engage the audience. The presentation would continue in this manner, with additional interior content and finally conclude by reiterating the main point made at the beginning of the presentation.

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